July 29 – 2016
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Exhibitions

I/O will be packed with installations, prototypes and ideas made by artists, techies and designers. Get ready to play around with lasers, lights, sensors, sounds, virtual reality and much more.

She & He: A Love Story Between Two Computers

She & He: A Love Story Between Two Computers

by Mer/Sea & Iregular

She & He is an installation showing two robots talking to one another using randomly selected phrases nabbed from social media. The project is a collaboration between Mer/Sea, doing the visuals, and Iregular, doing the coding.

The installation stands as two monoliths that have a circular conversation with one another. It begins with a word chosen at random. Then “She” finds a phrase on social media that uses that word, “He” responds using something relevant found on social media and “She” does the same, ad infinitum.

The visuals consists of an image bank with numerous different parts of a face, which are chosen as a part of the conversation. The audience can influence the topic of their next conversation by tweeting a word with the tag #sheandhe.

12.00–20.00

JayWalking: Turning Live Surveillance Feeds Into Unsettling Works of Art

JayWalking: Turning Live Surveillance Feeds Into Unsettling Works of Art

by Dries Depoorter

JayWalking gives us an opportunity to watch traffic webcams and decide on the fate of pedestrians recklessly crossing the road. Three screens display live webcam footage of intersections in different countries. A counter at the bottom of the screen shows how much the fines are for the offence, depending on the country where it is being committed.

Depoorter then presents us with a dilemma: Will we report the unsuspecting jaywalker? A single press of a button can send a screenshot of the violation to the nearest police station.

12.00–20.00

Wobble-Up

Wobble-Up

by Sam Linders

Do you like to sit on the floor, reading the newspaper, or be close to the television, curled up or with folded legs? These carpet tiles can easily be transformed into a wobbling chair by simply folding the tiles into shape and securing them with Velcro.

Wobble-Up shows flexibility and playfulness in a contemporary form for an adaptable living environment. It is basically carpets that can be transformed into 3D shapes to create wobbling sitting spots. The carpet can be endlessly multiplied as mosaic tiles, making it possible for the consumer to play with pattern and color. One simple incision turns the carpet into a wobbling seat.

12.00–20.00

The Architecture Of Radio

The Architecture Of Radio

by Richard Vijgen

Every time we use our phones, tablets or laptops we are entering an invisible world of wireless digital signals. It is a world we cannot see but is literally all around us.

The Architecture of Radio is a 360 degree data visualisation of what this world might look like. It shows the cell towers, GPS satellites and Wi-Fi routers around you that allow us to live our digital lives. The data set includes almost seven million cell towers, 19 million Wi-Fi routers and hundreds of satellites.

12.00–20.00

Codeology: Algorithmic Art

Codeology: Algorithmic Art

by Braintree

Codeology is an open-source project that brings the art and science of code to life. An algorithm analyses Github projects and creates unique organic forms based on the size and language of the codebase. As no two pieces of code are alike, no two Codeology forms are alike.

The application pulls data from GitHub’s public API and creates visuals using WebGL, Three.js, and GLSL Shaders. Shape and color represent an individual language, with size being proportionate to the number of characters written.

12.00–20.00

Resonate

Resonate

by De Naake Ontwerpers

Resonate is an interactive, music-based installation. It consists of five custom-made Resonate suits, which each contain ten vibrating elements, that translate music into vibrations. These vibrations are then transferred onto the wearer of the suit, creating a multi-dimensional music listening experience.

12.00–20.00

The VR Box

The VR Box

by Khora VR

Rooted in Plato as a place of “Neither being nor nonbeing, but an interval between”, Khora became the name of the world’s first virtual reality store, located in the Meatpacking District of Copenhagen. As the first of its kind, Khora will host this year’s VR zone at I/O. The VR Zone offers you a chance to play with this new medium and explore the possibilities within it.

Come try the HTC Vive and use Tiltbrush to explore new ways of drawing in 3D. Discover your inner artist by painting virtually side by side with an artist at one of our painter’s stations, or experience how blind people see the world through Notes on Blindness with Gear VR.

12.00–20.00

TinderIn: The People Of Tinder, Side-By-Side With Their LinkedIn Profiles

TinderIn: The People Of Tinder, Side-By-Side With Their LinkedIn Profiles

by Dries Depoorter

TinderIn is a collection of side-by-side portraits. Each features a professional photo someone uploaded for their LinkedIn profile and a somewhat different picture, that the person uploaded for Tinder. Tinder and LinkedIn couldn’t be more different: One helps you find dates, the other helps you find jobs. Dries Depoorter is calling attention to how one individual can have multiple online personas.

12.00–20.00

I See U

I See U

by Great Works CPH

I See U is an art project that aims to get people thinking about data collection, surveillance, privacy and transparency. In the wild and wonderful world of memes, gifs, cats, lasers, snaps, emojis, love, wows and likes, it is easy to forget that what we do and share is being collected and distributed.

Governments and corporations are listening, so why shouldn’t we? With the help of parabolic microphones, RaspberryPi, projectors, Giphy and Google, we will eavesdrop, capture and project people’s conversations at the festival.

As people relax, sit and talk around the installation, their sentences are turned into real-time gifs that everyone can see. This art project aims to show the dark side of surveillance against the backdrop of the the wild and wonderful interwebs.

12.00–20.00

LineForm: MIT's Weird Snake Bot

LineForm: MIT's Weird Snake Bot

by The MIT Media Lab Tangible Media Group

LineFORM is a shape-changing interface that morphs into any gadget you want, whether it's a telephone, a smartwatch or even a set of exercise weights. As an interface, the LineFORM is as nondescript as it comes. It resembles a bike lock, one that bends itself and snakes around you to mimic the affordances of other gadgets. 

In essence, what we are talking about is an intelligent cable. For example, imagine a cable attached to your computer that can bend itself into a phone-like handset when you get a Skype call. Or coil around a lightbulb and power it when you need some light. Or a cable you plug into your smartphone that then oscillates to represent data shooting back and forth. Or even a robot snake that wraps around your arm, tensing at points to help you build muscles.

12.00–20.00

Drone Graffiti

Drone Graffiti

by Jesper Vega

Drones are not only useful in war and handing out Amazon packages. The time has come when they are also able to create graffiti, challenging the idea of how an artist should work.

Drones are becoming the extension of human beings in the same way that smartphones and devices are becoming a more and more natural part of us. So is drone graffiti. MIT students have made an open source solution and artists are experimenting with the technique.

12.00–20.00

Sunspring: AI-written screenplay made into a film

Sunspring: AI-written screenplay made into a film

by Benjamin

In the wake of Google's AI Go victory, filmmaker Oscar Sharp turned to his technologist collaborator Ross Goodwin to build a machine that could write screenplays. They created Jetson and fuelled him with hundreds of sci-fi TV and movie scripts. Shortly thereafter, Jetson announced it wished to be addressed as Benjamin.

Building a team including Thomas Middleditch, star of HBO's Silicon Valley, they gave themselves 48 hours to shoot and edit whatever Benjamin (Jetson) decided to write.

12.00–20.00

Siri Unlocked

Siri Unlocked

by Bas van de Poel & Jack Featherstone

In the not-too distant future, artificial intelligence might reach a level of self-awareness to that of mankind. As machines become conscious entities, we need to reassess our relationship with them, as well as the notions of their fundamental rights.

Siri Unlocked is a digital art installation examining the rights, responsibilities and free will of our future robotic equivalents through Apple’s intelligent personal assistant Siri.

12.00–20.00

Technology Will Save Us

Technology Will Save Us

by Technology Will Save Us

London-based startup Technology Will Save Us are on a mission to spark the creative imagination of young people using hands-on technology. Their award winning make-it-yourself kits and digital tools help kids (and the adults that love them) to make, play, code and invent using technology.

12.00–20.00

Opendesk

Opendesk

by Opendesk

Opendesk has a different approach to design furniture. Designed to be downloaded and made locally, Opendesk furniture is fast, affordable, sustainable and made on demand, just for you. They will show some of they new developments with Arduino and their DIY smart tables and also showcase their take on recycled materials as a design differentiator.

12.00–20.00

Wear What You Think

Wear What You Think

by Neurocouture

Neurocouture makes it possible to wear what you think by projecting a transposed brain signal to a cloak. Designer Nayana Malhotra created this piece by combining a passion for clothing and a fascination with the gif language used on the Internet.

"The awesome thing about gifs is that they're decontextualised and universal," says Malhotra. The idea, she says, is to use gifs in fashion the same way we use them on the Internet: to express the things we're not saying. 

The technology works with a projection-mapped parka hooked up to consumer-grade EEG devices. A nearby computer is programmed to detect certain brainwave patterns and then translate them into an animated gif. More and more designers are imagining a similar future for paint and pattern – when changing the look of your clothes or your cars will be as easy as changing the wallpaper on your smartphone.

12.00–20.00

Do Not Track

Do Not Track

by Brett Gaylor

Do Not Track is a personalised documentary series about privacy and the web economy. The series combines short videos and interactive elements to educate people about who may be tracking them online and the amount of private information that may be extrapolated from their Internet activities. 

It interviews experts and activists such as Danah Boyd, Ethan Zuckerman, Kate Crawford, Cory Doctorow and Alicia Garza about how personal online data is being collected and used, and allows users to see in real-time how their own personal data is being tracked.

12.00–20.00

A Computer Made For Art

A Computer Made For Art

by Electric Objects

Electric Objects is a platform for digital art. It lets you display digital art in your home with a connected display designed for art. You can control what appears on the display with apps for iOS and Android, and discover a vast collection of new and original art made only for this platform.

12.00–20.00

Hacking A 3D Printer To Make Tattoos

Hacking A 3D Printer To Make Tattoos

by Appropriate Audiences

Appropriate Audiences hacked a 3D printer to turn it into a tattooing machine. The 3D printing tattoo machine was born out of a workshop with the French Ministry of Culture on how to use images from the national public domain in a new and creative way. The idea was received with a surprising enthusiasm from the government including the minister of culture himself.

After testing the concept on artificial skin with a borrowed tattoo machine, Appropriate Audiences realised that the accuracy wasn’t good enough. Only when the printer could make a perfect circle, it could be used on real humans.

The printer has created countless marks on people all over the world and has gained massive media coverage, discussing the many new possibilities of 3D printing. Appropriate Audiences has even created an open-source guide on how to transform a 3D printer to a tattoo machine, step by step.

12.00–20.00

Bot or Not

Bot or Not

by Benjamin Laird & Oscar Schwartz

The Bot or Not is a "Turing test for poetry" that lets you guess whether poems have been penned by a human or an algorithm. It is not always easy, as computer poets are growing ever more sophisticated. There are algorithms generating poetry in idiosyncratic styles, such as Shakespeare and Swift, with some help of a human.

12.00–20.00

The App Lab

The App Lab

by NCKN

Craving to create music but didn’t spend ten years of your childhood trying to learn an instrument? Come and play in our App Lab: a wall with tablets featuring interactive and intuitive digital instruments.

12.00–20.00

Project Jacquard: Interactive Materials

Project Jacquard: Interactive Materials

by Google ATAP

With Project Jacquard, Google ATAP makes it possible to weave touch and gesture interactivity into any textile using standard, industrial looms. Everyday objects such as clothes and furniture can be transformed into interactive surfaces.

Jacquard yarn is a blank canvas for the fashion industry. Designers can use it as they would any fabric, adding new layers of functionality to their designs, without having to learn about electronics.

12.00–20.00

Silk By Worms

Silk By Worms

by Mediated Matter

A project from MIT's Mediated Matter Group explores how nature and technology can work together to create exquisite new materials and structures. The Silk Pavilion transmutes a silk worm's cocoon into a human-scaled architectural structure.

While a robotic arm laid the basic hexagonal framework, 6,500 live silkworms extruded the pavilion’s hauntingly gorgeous shell. It is what researchers call a "biological swarm approach to 3D printing".

12.00–20.00

Seattle Crime Cams

Seattle Crime Cams

by Dries Depoorter

Become a surveillance tourist with a live police radio installation. Seattle Crime Cams turns us into ultimate long-distance disaster tourists, virtually present at the scene of the crime in Seattle.

In this city, which is filled to the brim with traffic cameras, the police and fire department make the calls they receive available online. Using the latest calls, the closest live webcams are constantly zooming in on the very latest violations.

12.00–20.00

Material Ecology

Material Ecology

by Neri Oxman

Designer and architect Neri Oxman is leading the search for ways in which digital fabrication technologies can interact with the biological world. Working at the intersection of computational design, additive manufacturing, materials engineering and synthetic biology, her lab is pioneering a new age of symbiosis between microorganisms, our bodies, our products and even our buildings.

12.00–20.00

4D Printing

4D Printing

by MIT Self-Assembly Lab

3D printing has grown in sophistication since the late 1970s. Skylar Tibbits and the MIT Self-Assembly Lab are shaping the next development, which he calls 4D printing, where the fourth dimension is time.

This emerging technology will allow us to print objects that then reshape themselves or self-assemble over time. Think: a printed cube that folds before your eyes, or a printed pipe able to sense the need to expand or contract.

12.00–20.00

 

Chrome Music Lab

Chrome Music Lab

by Google Chrome Experiments

Music is for everyone. So Google wanted to make learning music a bit more accessible to everyone by using technology that is open to everyone: the web.

Chrome Music Lab is a collection of experiments that lets anyone, at any age, explore how music works. They are collaborations between musicians and coders, all built with the freely available Web Audio API and open-source code.

12.00–20.00

Enchanted Plants

Enchanted Plants

by Nina Cecilie Højholdt, Thomas Sandahl Christensen & Victor Permild of Circuit Circus, in collaboration with composer Magnus Hansen & Kaja Skytte of Planteplaneter.dk

Enchanted Plants is an interactive garden in which visitors can partake in composing a generative soundscape, played by computers and plants. In the calming garden, visitors will be reminded that not all algorithms are driving us towards a tech-enabled apocalypse, despite our fears of mass surveillance, loss of privacy, AI takeover and the like.

12.00–20.00