July 29 – 2016
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Labs

The labs are all about getting involved, playing around and creating value together. We believe in an arena where the exploratory approach trumps the fear of failing and where collaboration is more important than showing off.

Design For Open Making

Design For Open Making

by Opendesk

Increasing access to digital fabrication has seen a new dimension in production arise, with decentralised, localised capacity and online tools resulting in a shift in manufacturing and distribution as we know it. With the help of CNC machining, 3D printing, laser cutting and other techniques, along with the spreading of fablabs and makerspaces around the world, designers and makers can now create their imagined products largely by themselves.

One of the companies at the forefront of digital fabrication is London-based Opendesk. Their global platform features open-sourced designs that can be downloaded as digital files, tweaked and then produced by independent fabricators locally – on demand, anywhere in the world. Opendesk makes products as close as possible to where they’re needed by shipping furniture as software, not heavy hardware.

At the moment, Opendesk is focusing on workspace furniture, but that is just the beginning. They are currently developing a range of smart products with integrated electronic components, and have also started looking into new materials. In a recent collaboration with Smile Plastics, a UK company that produces recycled sheet materials from entirely post-consumer waste plastics, old yoghurt pots and recycled bottles were used in the making of desks and stools.

We are super excited to have Opendesk host a lab on digital fabrication as part of this year’s Trailerpark I/O. The lab will explore the concepts of open source design, hacked design and local making, and also discuss how we can design for the circular economy and make our products interactive and responsive, using single-board computers like Arduino and Raspberry Pi.

10.00–12.00

No seats left

The DIY Surveillance Kit

The DIY Surveillance Kit

by Great Works CPH

We are proud to welcome creative studio Great Works CPH to I/O to help us explore the subject of surveillance with their do-it-yourself spy kit. The kit is part of the art project I See U, that aims to raise awareness of the large-scale data collection and surveillance happening today and trigger conversations around privacy and transparency.
 
Unlike corporate and governmental eavesdroppers, the device will turn overheard sentences into a series of real-time gifs. The kit comes with a parabolic microphone, Raspberry Pi single-board computer and touch screen, as well as a simple manual that helps the average citizen become a part-time spy.
 
At the lab, you will learn how to build your own surveillance kit and experience real-time data collection, that until now, has been the privilege of governments and corporations. The team at Great Works consists of idea makers, story builders and future shapers, working at the intersection of strategy, creativity and technology.

10.00–12.00

No seats left

The Future Of Virtual Reality

The Future Of Virtual Reality

by Khora VR

We are facing exciting times when it comes to virtual reality. Headsets like Oculus Rift and HTC Vive hit the consumer market this Spring, almost four years after Oculus Rift was launched as a product on Kickstarter and set off the current wave of interest in VR. Likewise, Google recently launched Daydream, a new VR platform for Android, that succeeds their first advance into the world of VR, Cardboard, that was introduced in 2014.

Millions of new users are around the corner and the questions surrounding the future of virtual reality are many. Seeing as VR creates strong illusions of embodiment, where you feel as if you own and control another body, what will the psychological consequences be? What effect will VR have on culture and creativity? And what are the obstacles for a medium that is purely about consuming media – and seems to require both technical knowledge and expensive gear – when it comes to the YouTube generation, that has grown up creating media themselves?

As a part of Trailerpark I/O, we are doing a lab on virtual reality in collaboration with Khora VR. Khora opened up the world's first virtual reality store in Copenhagen in February. Combining a storefront, educational platform and lab space, Khora aims to integrate people of all ages and walks of life who share a common interest in VR.

During the lab, we will explore current and future virtual worlds, try on different headsets and devices, check out available apps, discuss and experiment with what works best, and explore the many questions that are arising around the subject.

10.00–12.00

No seats left

The DIY Thirsty Plant Kit

The DIY Thirsty Plant Kit

by Technology Will Save Us

Technology is great when it helps spark our creativity and cross boundaries of geography, gender, class and sexuality. However, most of us are unaware of how our favorite objects actually work and how we can fix and hack them.

London-based startup Technology Will Save Us understands this and have set out on a mission to inspire kids and empower parents to become creators of technology. Their innovative and fun make-it-yourself kits and digital tools help kids (and the adults that love them) to make, play, code and invent using technology. Their kits include, amongst others, Electro-Dough, DIY Speakers, a Thirsty Plant Kit and the award winning DIY Gamer Kit that teaches you how to create the video games you love.

We are proud to welcome Technology Will Save Us to host a lab at I/O and give a fresh perspective on the way technology works. During the lab we will work in community, putting things together, taking them apart and learning how they work.

10.00–12.00

No seats left

 The Future of AI and Conversational Interfaces

The Future of AI and Conversational Interfaces

by Double

Everyone seems to agree that if the mobile cloud was the previous era of computing, the next era will be artificial intelligence. Computers become better in understanding the world day by day. Lawyers can be replaced by robots. Customer service is being replaced by intelligent software. Pattern recognition software recognizes faces better than humans. 

What are the challenges and what are the opportunities in a future where artificial intelligence will replace human interaction? And how can we as humans prepare ourselves for talking to computers? Is it possible to design trust between humans and AI?

Right now, a near future with artificial intelligence raises more questions than it gives answers. And it might just be the beauty of it. Our world is shaped by those who take action and has the courage and curiosity to work with what we don’t yet know much about. One thing is for sure: AI has a major potential. The question is just how big we want it to be. Or, to be even more precise: How big AI wants itself to be. 

As a part of I/O, we are exploring the future of artificial intelligence with particular focus on conversational interfaces with the design studio Double. Together with Space10, Double is currently exploring how IKEA can make use of conversational interfaces and other forms of AI across a wide range of touchpoints. 

During the lab, we will explore examples of conversational interfaces and discuss how a future with AI might change the way we see the world – from interacting with a company to solving tasks related to everyday practice.

10.00–12.00

No seats left

Developing Wearable LED’s

Developing Wearable LED’s

by FabLab RUC

Wearable technology are clothing and accessories incorporating computer and advanced electronic technologies, with smartwatches and activity trackers being two of the more common examples. But what says we can’t create our own wearables?

As part of I/O, we are doing a lab on wearable tech and wearable LED lights with the guys from FabLab RUC, an experimental research and learning environment at Roskilde University.

FabLab RUC consists of an open fablab, rapid prototyping laboratory and digital production workshops. At the fablab, which is open for all, you can work with everything from wood, plastics, metal and cloth to electronics, programming and computer controlled manufacturing, and build a prototype of any technological system.

During the lab at I/O, you will be guided through the core elements of developing wearable devices, and learn to design wearable light devices based on an introduction to Arduino programming and LED light programming. Light up your skateboard, put flashing lights on your bike – imagination is the limit. Participants are requested to bring their own laptop.

10.00–12.00

No seats left

Artificial Creativity And Journalism

Artificial Creativity And Journalism

by Brain Gain Group

Is creativity only for humans, or do robots and computers also have creative agency? What does it mean for our understanding of being human when machines are producing journalism and art work that is inseparable from human creation? And do we really want robots as investigative reporters?    

The robots have until now aided us with our hard labour, but perhaps now is the time for the academics and the artists to worry. The robots are going after skilled labour and are already deployed in the fields of journalism and art.

To explore this subject further, we have invited Copenhagen-based media company Brain Gain Group to host a lab and techno-philosophical investigation at Trailerpark I/O. Brain Gain Group combine skills from academia with the craft of journalism and media production, and aim to empower young creatives and bring them together with potential collaborators in order to promote thought leadership in the form of content, events and education.

During the lab Brain Gain Group will investigate how the exponential growth in technology is affecting us, and what space and identity possibilities it leaves behind, along with experts within the fields of journalism, philosophy, art and tech-science. You will be invited to imagine a future not far away, where scenarios are exceeding the best sci-fi movies, and discuss the concept of human existence in a world of deep technological transformation. The future is getting close – let’s have a look at it!

10.00–12.00

No seats left

Circular Product Development

Circular Product Development

by KPH Projects, Creature & Incita

Get in touch with your inner creativity through craftsmanship, and transform trashed and leftover materials into new, innovative products. Join the KPH Projects lab with Creature and Incita at I/O.

Get a hands-on experience and dive into circular economy by joining Creature and Incita in building, testing and inventing new multifunctional products with the focus on items you believe could make everyday life just a bit more hassle-free. Bring new life to materials long forgotten in our consumer-focused daily lives. During the lab you will work with materials such as bicycle frames, bicycle tires, cardboard, circuit boards, computer keyboards, glass bottles, ground coffee, metal strings, optical fibers, plastic casing, wood, wood pallets... and much, much more!

The lab will be kicked off with an introduction to the many materials and a presentation of the Creature and Incita venture. Creature is a social innovation bureau that improves society through business, and is specialised in cooperation processes and facilitation, sustainability, entrepreneurship and social innovation.

Creature has recently joined forces with Incita, a social economic production company who employ citizens with neuro damage and citizens whom, for various other reasons, are on edge of the labour force. Together, the two companies aim to change the way we see materials, and to see opportunities rather than trash.

10.00–12.00

No seats left